Liberation in Print


A Letter from the Future
Feminist Findings
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A Letter from the Future

Connecting across time and space with the team behind Berlin’s Courage magazine.
Klaudia Mazur
By Klaudia Mazur
Is There Anyone Reading out There?
Designing Resistance
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Is There Anyone Reading out There?

A step into 90s Italian fanzine scene: Speed Demon and its queer community.
Elio Raimondi
Vittoria Pugliese
By Elio Raimondi, Vittoria Pugliese
Some Serious Surprises
Feminist Findings
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Some Serious Surprises

A list of articles on feminist publishing in the 1980s feminist art magazine Chrysalis.
Loraine Furter
By Loraine Furter
Iterative at Heart
Feminist Findings
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Iterative at Heart

Spare Rib’s continuously shifting design found a middle-ground between mainstream and counterculture.
Silva Baum
By Silva Baum
Feminism. What’s In a Word?
Feminist Findings
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Feminism. What’s In a Word?

Reclaiming the keyword for women’s liberation from misogynistic nineteenth-century French literature.
Delphine Bedel
By Delphine Bedel
“What Do You Think History Is?”
Feminist Findings
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“What Do You Think History Is?”

A brief conversation with Liza Cowan, editor of 1970s lesbian separatist periodical DYKE A Quarterly.
Clara Amante
By Clara Amante
Torn in Two Directions
Feminist Findings
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Torn in Two Directions

The journal making space for Muslim women’s voices during France’s notorious “veil affair.”
Eugénie Zuccarelli
By Eugénie Zuccarelli
The Courage to Take Space
Feminist Findings
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The Courage to Take Space

What can mapping the 1970s Women’s Movement in Germany tell us about feminism today?
Mio Kojima
By Mio Kojima
A Writer Is a Woman Who Writes
Feminist Findings
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A Writer Is a Woman Who Writes

The ways Iowa City’s Common Lives/Lesbian Lives attracted its various voices.
Amy Gowen
By Amy Gowen
Financing Feminism Through Beads and Brioche
Feminist Findings
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Financing Feminism Through Beads and Brioche

In the late 70s in Paris, an underground salon disguised itself as a tearoom to smuggle subversive ideas.
Fanny Maurel
By Fanny Maurel